Photoset
Text

fullmetalnoodlist:

real gamers eat their video games

(via the-french-toast-queen)

Photo
craftbeerlibrary:

How California deals with earthquakes. 6.0 this morning in Napa. (Photo credit: Jeremy Carroll)

craftbeerlibrary:

How California deals with earthquakes. 6.0 this morning in Napa. (Photo credit: Jeremy Carroll)

(via kiss-my-assbutt)

Photoset
Photoset

coolkitkatuniverse:

leftside1312:

"Communists proletarians women of PKK fighting ISIS islamists and defending the civilian population in Iraq.
The official press release says nothing of these fighters.”

https://www.facebook.com/internationalriot

woah.

(via runfreakrun)

Photoset
Quote
"School ripped the passion I had for writing out of my soul and buried it in a pile of shit a million miles away. And that’s the thing - school is meant to make you flourish - it’s supposed to reach deep into your mind and fill your head with passion, knowledge, education. Yet I spend my nights with my overused notebook open, pages seeping with endless memories and turmoil suffered over the years, and I am afraid that if I write something incorrectly, I’ll get a bad grade. My mind has been corrupted by an infinite amount of stimulus and criteria, so much so that I can’t even write one, simple word. I can’t write about my own experiences, my own pain or my own happiness. School has fucked me so many times. I lack passion and the desire to live. I’ll never be the person to say that school handed me the best years of my life. It’s stolen my life."

— An Eager Year 12 Student (via prelovers)

Hits fucking home.

(via stop-being-human)

(Source: jpzg, via make-mydamn-day)

Photoset

wilwheaton:

blacksupervillain:

blacksupervillain:

hussieologist:

jcoleknowsbest:

hussieologist:

jcoleknowsbest:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

darvinasafo:

Darren Hunt of Utah

The murder of young Black Men by police continues.

oh for fucks SAKE

Y’all he was shot in the back…. HE WAS SHOT IN THE BACK…

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/58409680-78/family-hunt-moss-police.html.csp

He was carrying a sword? This mf in my geography class carried a sword to class everyday and when I expressed my discomfort it was dismissed. But this brotha was shot in the back.

and it was a blunted sword.. couldn’t have cut anybody… but white people walking around with loaded rifles in target…

Exactly! This is evil.

Damn. Niggas can’t even cosplay anymore? I would love to see the cosplay community say something about this but that definitely won’t happen

Also: this paper is edited by a clown. It should’ve been in the first fucking paragraph that this dude was cosplaying. I’m reading this shit wondering why the fuck this negro is walking down the street with a sword and obvious answer is hidden almost at the en of the article.

This dude was cosplaying.

He was dressed up in a costume.

Should all black people just stay home on Halloween this year?

Friendly reminder that the police shot a black cosplayer in the back

Jesus Christ, American law enforcement. Get your fucking shit together.

(via the-french-toast-queen)

Photoset
Photoset
Video

thatrandomcontradictorychick:

ayoboe:

officialfolgers:

lumos5001:

weloveshortvideos:

How to hit high notes…

i just snorted pop into my nose wtf

I played the video and before it even started I saw the balloon and started crying

and their singing lux aurumque 

the guy on the left looks so concerned

(via kiss-my-assbutt)

Photo
autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

(via camtankerous)

Photo
Photoset

punishandenslavesuckers:

#r u fukin srs rn #why cant I watch my lil girl go to robot prom? #mako is going to robot prom #and imma miss it cuz of u #I will beat the both of you # like red-head stepchildren #I’ve had practice #chuck hansen exists #you dumb fucks 

(Source: paxxan, via fuckyeahpacificrim)

Photoset

Satisfaction’s not in my nature.

(Source: thorsodinson, via tonyloki)